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dysbiosis

Scratches, Rain Rot, Dermatitis and Skin Allergies in the Horse

Scratches, rain rot, and skin allergies in the horse…oh my!  Skin problems in the horse are very, very common and at the top of complaints for many horse owners.  For most, they are easily resolved with a little attention, while for others, the skin problems fester and turn into real concerns.  Why are these problems …

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Building the Topline in the Horse; The Importance of Nutrition and Gut Health

The topline in your horse is one of the most important groups of muscles that supports the vertebral column, the rider and saddle, and facilitates proper movement in power.  The topline in the horse is also one of the most underdeveloped muscle groups in a high percentage of horses.  Take the saddle off of many …

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Equine Fecal Cultures, the Microbiome, and Cur-OST EQ Tri-GUT

For decades we as veterinarians and horse owners have struggled with many equine health conditions and even soundness.  It seems like in the past 20 years, we have made no further progress in the management of laminitis, metabolic concerns, sore feet, tendon injuries, allergies, EIPH, anhidrosis, and many other conditions.  Despite applying the past knowledge …

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The Equine Diet and Picky Eaters; Thoughts and Concerns

One of my major concerns, as a veterinarian and researcher, is the inflammatory process and how it can dictate health and soundness.  This process is complex, involving many contributors, but diet is a major player.  As we investigate further the impact of gastrointestinal health on overall health and soundness, certain things begin to fall into place and become more obvious. The first item is diet, what we are feeding and how we define this. The second item of concern is the picky eater, which more than likely we have all encountered at one time or another.  Many owners feel this ‘pickiness’ is often ‘cute’ or a trait for a particular horse….but is there more to it?  Is this actually a symptom or sign of something larger?