Tag Archives: CurOST

Vitamin E in the Neurological Horse; Maybe More Harm Than Good?

Vitamin E often goes hand in hand with conditions such as EPM (equine protozoal myeloencephalitis) , EDM (equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy), and even PSSM (polysaccharide storage myopathy) in the horse.  This vitamin possess moderate antioxidant capabilities and can render much needed benefits to those horses afflicted with those conditions, however, not every horse responds and in fact, there is clinical evidence that some horses might actually deteriorate.  Despite rendering antioxidant properties, is there maybe more to the story, regarding vitamin E supplementation in the horse and should a broader approach be utilized for improved outcomes? (more…)

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Cur-OST EQ Inflammend; Harnessing the Power of Turmeric in the Horse

Inflammation is at the core of most horse related lameness and health conditions.  The cellular process is present, contributing to a high level of dysfunction and even degeneration, but we are often left with the ultimate question as to how to aid the situation.  Many current therapies target the inflammatory process, helping to balance it, but more times than not, we are left seeking, as a horse owner, veterinarian, and farrier.  What more can be done to help the horse and to further promote balance in that inflammatory process, while also keeping cost under control?  Curcumin and Turmeric extracts could prove to provide real solutions! (more…)

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Does My Horse Need a Supplement?

Does my horse need a supplement?  A very common question that is presented to me as a veterinarian and also one that I see on FB and other social media outlets.  It’s a good question, but as with anything when it comes to health or soundness, there is no one answer that fits every horse.  You have to define what a supplement is and its purpose.  Then, you have to look at your specific horse, their needs, your goals, and other factors that are in play.   (more…)

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Equine Health and the Importance of the Off Season

Equine health and soundness is critical for the competition athlete.  It is something that many struggle with during the competitive season, which then often translates into the off season with hopes of full recovery.  In many cases, the time off does allow for repair, just due to the fact of reduced stress, but for others, the problems persist. There may be more that can be done to further enhance the body and accelerate the recovery process, during that much needed time off .  (more…)

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Advanced Thinking.  Advanced Results.Whole Food and Herb-Based Formulas to Assist Recovery and Health.Free Shipping on Orders Over $75 in the U.S.A. Check out ourinformational videosClick on this YouTube Logoto go to our YouTube channelCurOST Curcumin 95% Based Canine and Equine Supplements.  What We Are All About…. Health & SoundnessDr. Thomas Schell, (DVM, DABVP, CVCH)Equine Supplements for health […]

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Thrush, Solar Abscesses and Bruises; A Pain in the Foot

The equine foot is one of the most common sources of lameness, often contributing up to 80% in most cases.  Many times, the pain originates in the foot or hoof, then transfering up the limb to create secondary lameness concerns.  Three of the most common sources of frustration and lameness in the foot are abscess conditions, bruises and thrush, not excluding white line disease.  They are very common but continue to plague many horses on a daily basis, proving difficult to remedy at times.  As with most cases, with a better understanding of the conditions, we stand a better chance of success in regards to management. (more…)

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Equine Navicular Syndrome and Heel Pain; New Perspectives

Navicular syndrome (disease) and heel pain is a very common problem in the equine industry, likely impacting 30% or more of horses, dependent on the breed and discipline. We see this condition commonly in the western disciplines but also to varying degrees in other sports, including jumping, dressage and even racing. There are many factors that contribute to the problem, which can make it difficult at times to manage. All too often, though, we tend to wait until the condition has progressed, with irreversible damage, before we properly intervene.  With a better understanding, hopefully we can recognize the condition sooner, see contributing factors and produce better results for the patient in the long term. (more…)

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To Breathe Or Not To Breathe; COPD & I.A.D.

The respiratory tract is an organ that is commonly impacted in the horse, resulting in COPD and IAD. Inhalation of oxygen is vital for energy production and overall cellular health, but in many equine athletes, they struggle to move air in and out resulting in decreased performance and quality of life. Many horse owners rely heavily on pharmaceutical medications such as steroids and bronchodilators, but despite their use, their horse continues to struggle to gain results and improve in quality of life. (more…)

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Disease; Cause or Effect, Acquired or Created

Happiness and an end to suffering.  That is the goal for almost all of mankind.  We want it, crave it and desire it on many levels.  Disease occurs on many levels and impacts all of us either directly or indirectly.  The perception of that disease, whether if it affects us our pets or our horses, can vary from person to person.  One may say it is acquired or there is a genetic predisposition to that condition.  On the other side of the coin, another person may say the disease is a reflection of our environment, diet and other factors…essentially implying we created it.  It is all relative, in my opinion, but one thing is for certain and that is that with a complete understanding of what is occurring, we stand a better chance of prevention as well as management.

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Why is my horse always lame? Solving the Mystery

One of the most common problems in the equine athlete and pleasure horse is recurring lameness, which can be equally frustrating for owner, rider, and the veterinarian.  At one moment, the issue may seem resolved, bringing relief, but then it may recur or maybe even a new problem develops. Being a veterinarian, horse owner and involved in the rehabilitation of horses, I understand the frustration but have come to realize that there is much to discover, learn and reveal when it comes to seeing the ‘entire’ horse in these situations. More often than not, the primary problem the horse is presented for is actually not the main issue, but in order to see the true problem, we need to step back and look at several factors. Despite us wanting to fix everything in one fail swoop, often the issue is more complex than we would like it to be. (more…)

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